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Contracted Projects

EU Mine Waste Directive – risk-based inventory in Hungary

Gyozo Jordan: PROJECT LEADER, MAFI

The Mine Waste Directive requires the risk-based inventory of all mine waste sites in Europe by May 2012. The Hungarian approach is based on the EU guidance document co-authored by Gyozo Jordan: Stanley G., Jordan G., Hamor T., Sponar, M. 2011. Guidance Document for A Risk-Based Selection Protocol for the Inventory of Closed Waste Facilities as required by Article 20 of Directive 2006/21/EC, Brussels. European Commission , and it also considers the European Commission PECOMINES Project results published in the book: Jordan G., D’Alessandro M. (eds) Mining, mining waste and related environmental issues: problems and solutions in the Central and Eastern European candidate countries. Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Ispra. LB-NA-20868-EN-C, 13-34. Figures shows results, risk ranking and a case study. The project is contracted by the Hungarian Bureau of Mining and Geology.

See the official web site for the Hungarian National Report for EU Brussels for reference.

Inert mining waste – geochemical classification in Hungary

Gyozo Jordan: PROJECT LEADER, MAFI

The Mine Waste Directive requires the classification of mine waste into inert, non-inert non-hazardous and hazardous waste. By definition of the Directive, “inert waste” means waste that does not undergo any significant physical, chemical or biological transformations. Inert waste will not dissolve, burn or otherwise physically or chemically react, biodegrade or adversely affect other matter with which it comes into contact in a way likely to give rise to environmental pollution or harm human health. The total leachability and pollutant content of the waste and the ecotoxicity of the leachate must be insignificant, and in particular not endanger the quality of surface water and/or groundwater. 93 samples have been collected from a selection of mines and analysed for total toxic element content (aqua regia extraction), for mobile element assessment (destilled water leaching), and for sulphide-sulphure content (acid mine drainage generation potential), according to ISO standard procedures. Together with archive geochemical data, laboratory results have been compared to environmental standards and inert waste classification has been performed. The project is contracted by the Hungarian Bureau of Mining and Geology.

Rare Earth Element (REE) – mineral resources assessment, Hungary

Gyozo Jordan: PROJECT LEADER, MAFI

1. REE in RED MUD

REE elements are essential high-tech strategic mineral resources and are much sought for in the recent world economic development conditions. In the first project phase the four large red mud reservoirs in Hungary have been investigated, sampled and analysed for REE element content. Current efforts target at other igneous and secondary sedimentary rock formations. The project is contracted by the Hungarian Bureau of Mining and Geology.

2. REE in ROCK

Sand, clay, granite and other rock formations have been investigated for REE content.